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Examiner article about the book

Mia just emailed me this one.  I very much enjoyed this particular one, so I thought I’d share it:

http://www.examiner.com/books-in-durham/food-from-the-wild-review

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One thought on “Examiner article about the book

  1. (this was initially an electronic missive of the Gmail sort of category… if the length is a problem, erasure is the answer)

    Kevin,

    You are a fine accompaniment to the life I have led in the company of our incredible biome, regions, and history with the same. Your videos and passion for the world we live in: how lucky I truly am to have discovered you.

    I am from Indiana. I can, as I am sure you know, certainly relate to the large percentage of foods mentioned in that wonderful article which do very, very well indeed in the moderate temperate wooded sections that fill the Indiana basin of the Ohio River Valley. While nothing even remotely near the Bay area in human culture, Indiana has an abundance of natural splendor that is truly unknown… even amongst the Hoosiers that imagine they know that place best.

    Only in the bare smears of remainder that you can find in a straight sided, very deep, hole—- can a person find the remains, broken by time, of the people who held the gifts of a completely forested 60 to 70,000 square miles in the highest of esteem. You, Kevin, remember their keening prayers as some others might simply laugh. To imagine the hopes and the succor held in the hands of such ancient seekers. You, Kevin, have within you the perfect tools to present to our world such dramatic and passionate wisdoms in a manner that scares no-one.

    I will never know enough. The moon rose tonight in the home I moved to from my beloved Indiana six months ago. I now live in the Watermelon Mountains east of Albuquerque, off Highway 14, The Turquoise Trail. Here in Sandia Park you can go for a six mile run through the Pinon, Cedar and Juniper forests of trees hundreds of years old. Few people living in the trees even slightly care. The bears and coyote and birds and snakes as big as my arm love this world, however. While running through the arroyo I looked to the East and saw an indistinct smudge around 6:45 PM between the peaks of two mountains. I stopped running and stood for 25 minutes in awe at the calculus of our unbelievable High Desert Heaven. I felt a portion of my being give over to that moment in a way it has only a very few other times. The bottom of the Grand Canyon. Certain beautiful, tricky passages in the deep, deep caves of my beloved Indiana. Standing before that moon tonight on a six mile run of ecstasy through this new home of mine. I would never have chosen to leave Indiana, if my parents were not living here. I came to serve them. I plan to buy land in Indiana and New Mexico. I plan to bow before to beautiful things that can be eaten in the Watermelon Mountains: The Sandia Mountains. People have lived here for many thousands of years.

    You show them a respect that I have so much to learn from.

    Kevin, I will never stop listening. Be well, my friend.

    Respectfully,

    Andy Coffey

    Sandia Park, NM

    The coyotes sing and howl even now. The black bears are looking for trash. The modern people sit in their expensive homes and wonder how to bring the endless beauty outside of their doors… somehow, in. We live and feel the question. We die before we can hope for an answer. Thank-you….

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